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Stick Electrode Welding Ovens (SMAW)

Portable Electrode Welding Rod Holding Ovens
Bench Electrode Welding Rod Holding Ovens
Floor Electrode Welding Rod Holding Ovens
Floor Electrode Welding Rod Holding and Rebake Ovens

Made in the USA and ruggedly constructed, Keen stick electrode storage and rebake welding ovens are available in a wide variety of capacities to suit the most rigorous shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) operations.  We offer the widest storage capacity range in the industry and can customize any unit upon request.  We also have the unmatched ability to design one-of-a-kind welding electrode storage ovens for unique storage requirements.  Welding codes are constantly changing, and Keen is ready to meet the demands of today’s welders.

Below is a list of industries where Keen welding electrode storage and rebake ovens are commonly used:

  • Pipe Line Welding Repair and Fabrication
  • Structural Welding
  • Ship Repair and Conversion
  • Shipbuilding
  • Steel Elevated Water Tanks
  • Boiler and Pressure Vessel Repair and Fabrication
  • Steel Tank Fabrication
  • Large Sign Fabrication
  • Aerospace Machinery Repair and Fabrication

Call Keen today 1-888-512-2870.

See Frequently Asked Questions

Keen Portable Welding Rod Holding Ovens
Model Capacity Interior Dimension Voltage Temperature

KT-15HT
15 lbs
18" rods
3” diameter X 18.5” deep 240v

500F+
(260C+)


K-10
10 lbs.
14" rods
(Does not store 18" rods)
3" x 3" x 15" Dual voltage
120V/240V

Constant Input - Max 300°F


KT-15
15 lbs.
18" rods
3.3" x 3.3" x 19" Dual voltage
120V/240V

Constant Input - Max 300°F


K-15R
15 lbs.
18" rods
3.3" x 3.3" x 19" 120V

Preset 275 F (135 C) Temp Non-Adjustable


KT-15 W/T
15 lbs.
18" rods
3.3" x 3.3" x 19" Dual voltage 120V/240V 100°-300° F
(38°-149° C)
Preset 275° F

KT-50
50 lbs.
18" rods
6" x 6" x 19" Dual voltage
120V/240V
100°-300° F
(38°-149° C)
Preset 275° F

K-20SS
Stainless Steel
15 lbs.
18" rods
3" x 3" x 19" Dual voltage
120V/240V

100°-300° F
(38°-149° C)


KT-50SS
Stainless Steel
50 lbs.
18" rods
6" x 6" x 19" Dual voltage
120V/240V
100°-300° F
(38°-149° C)
Preset 275° F
Keen Bench Welding Rod Holding Ovens
Model Capacity Interior Dimension

Single
Voltage

Temperature

K-200
200 lbs.
18" rods
12.5" x 12.5" x 18.25" 120v & 240v

150°-300° F
(38°-149° C)
Dial adjustable


K-450
450 lbs.
18" rods
19.5" x 20" 120v & 240v 150°F - 550°F
(65°C - 288°C)
Dial Adjustable
Keen Floor Welding Rod Holding Ovens
Model Capacity Interior Dimension Single
Voltage
Temperature

K-900
1,000 lbs.
18" rods
18" x 18.5" x 36" 120v & 240v

150°-550° F
(65°-288° C)


K-1000
1,500 lbs.
18" rods
27" x 20.5" x 40" 120v & 240v 150°-550° F
(65°-288° C)
Keen Welding Rod Holding and Rebake Ovens
Model Capacity Interior Dimension Single
Voltage
Temperature

KHT-50
50 lbs
18" rods
6.5" x 6.5" x 18.5 120V-240v Ambient - 662°F
(Ambient - 350°C)

KHT-200
200 lbs 18" rods. Interior is fitted with diagonal shelving that allows storage of 50 lb. electrode tines or loose electrodes. 18" x 14" x 14" 240v-480v Ambient-999°F
(Ambient - 537°C)

KHT-500
475 lbs.
18" rods. Interior is fitted with diagonal shelving that allows storage of 50 lb. electrode tines or loose electrodes.
18" x 19" x 18" 240v

Ambient-999°F
(Ambient - 537°C)


KHT-900

1,000 lbs.
18" rods. Interior is fitted with diagonal shelving that allows storage of 50 lb. electrode tines or loose electrodes.
18" x 18.5" x 36" 240v Ambient-999°F
(Ambient - 537°C)

*Custom Shelving Available

Frequently Asked Questions

What are stick electrodes and what is shielded metal arc welding (SMAW)?

Why do I need to store stick welding electrodes in a heated oven?

What are the proper storage and rebaking guidelines for stick rods?

What is the difference between welding electrode holding and welding electrode rebaking?

What are the key differences between welding rod holding ovens and welding rod rebake ovens?

Can I use a Keen portable holding oven for long term storage?

Are the large ovens used only for long term storage?

How can I determine the amp draw for a particular rod oven model?

What is the permissible atmospheric exposure of low-hydrogen welding rods?

Are there any commonly known welding rod storage methods that are inadequate?

What are common storage and handling mistakes that can lead to damaged welding rods?

What issues can potentially result during welding from improperly stored welding rods?

What terms should I know that are related to poor storage of welding consumables?

How can I tell if the coating on my low-hydrogen welding rods has been compromised?

How can I find recommended storage guidelines from the manufacture of my consumable?

How do storage methods differ for low hydrogen rods, stainless steel rods, cellulosic rods and non-low hydrogen rods?

Can I store different types of welding electrodes simultaneously in a rod oven?


 

What are stick electrodes and what is shielded metal arc welding (SMAW)?

SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) is a manual arc welding process that is often called stick welding.  It is one of the most popular welding processes used today.  Its popularity is due to the versatility of the process and the simplicity and low cost of the equipment and operation.  SMAW is commonly used with such materials as mild steel, cast iron, and stainless steel.

The process requires a consumable electrode that is coated in flux (stick rod) to lay the weld, and an electric current is used to create an electric arc between the electrode and the metals that are being welded together.  The electric current may be either an alternating current or a direct current from a welding power supply.

While the weld is being laid, the electrode’s flux coating disintegrates.  This produces vapors that provide a shielding gas and a layer of slag.  Both the gas and slag protect the weld pool from atmospheric contamination.  The flux also serves to add scavengers, deoxidizers, and alloying elements to the weld metal.

For more in-depth information on stick welding, click here: http://www.keenovens.com/products/stick-electrodes-details.html

Why do I need to store stick welding electrodes in a heated rod oven?

In stick welding (SMAW), the most commonly used welding electrode is low hydrogen 7018.  It is covered with flux which is hygroscopic (easily absorbs moisture from the air).  This flux coating burns and converts into a shielding gas that protects the weld pool from atmospheric contaminants such as hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and others. If these contaminants enter the weld pool they will cause defects such as cracking, and porosity (worm holes.)  These defects can create a weak point at which the weld may fail under stress or load.

Low-hydrogen 7018 rods are just what their name states…low hydrogen. They allow very little hydrogen into the weld pool unless they have been stored improperly and contaminated by moisture.  Moisture allows hydrogen into the flux, which is then introduced into the weld pool adversely. This moisture contamination is super-heated during the welding process, converts into steam and then bubbles up to the surface leaving an open pocket in the finished weld bead. So at that particular spot the weld is weaker because it is not a solid bead.  This will happen at the beginning of the bead with each new rod used, and diminish as the rod heats up and burns the moisture out as it is being consumed.

Moisture-contaminated rods may make a good-looking weld at first, but they will be subject to longitudinal cracking either right after welding, or later on (longitudinal cracking occurs where a crack begins at one point and follows the length of the weld).  Defects may also be noticed by a visiting welding inspector as described by one of our seasoned welders here :

http://www.keenovens.com/articles/welding_inspectors.htm
Many welding job sites and shops do not follow proper electrode storage guidelines set forth by welding electrode manufacturers and the American Welding Society.

What are the proper storage and rebaking guidelines for stick rods?

For specific storage and rebake temperature guidelines, we recommend contacting the welding consumable manufacturer directly.  It is also important to check with local welding codes and/or ask a welding inspector to provide some information.  Welding standards change frequently, and each manufacturer often provides a different recommendation regarding welding electrode storage.  Check the packaging and also manufacturer websites for information.  Keen offers a wide range of products to handle almost any welding consumable storage requirement.

What is the difference between welding electrode holding and welding electrode rebaking?

Generally, there are two processes involved with the proper maintenance of stick welding electrodes: holding (also called storing) and rebaking (also called reconditioning).

The holding process refers to the short-term* or long-term** heated storage of welding electrodes to maintain factory-fresh dryness.  Storing the rods at elevated temperatures prevents atmospheric moisture contamination of the electrode’s hygroscopic flux coating.  There are various temperature requirements according to the type of electrode and also that are also set forth by welding codes.  For specific holding temperature guidelines, please contact the manufacturer of your consumable.

The rebaking process refers to the short-term*, high temperature heating of welding rods that have been or may have been contaminated by atmospheric moisture.  The rebaking process “reconditions” the welding rod, meaning it bakes out the moisture that has entered the coating thus restoring the electrode so it is suitable for reuse.  Many large shops have a rebake rod oven in the tool crib in which electrodes coming back from the field are procedurally rebaked as a precaution to remove any moisture, and then put into a holding oven for long term low temperature storage for reuse.  For specific rebake temperature guidelines, please contact the manufacturer of your consumable.

* - In relation to our products, we consider short-term to mean 8 hours or less.

** - In relation to our products, we consider long-term to mean 24 hours/day 7 days/week.

What are the key differences between welding rod holding ovens and welding rod rebake ovens?

Keen rod ovens are specifically designed according to the temperature range of the process, and the amount of electrodes to be stored.  The standard holding ovens are designed to accommodate a maximum temperature of 550F and the rebake ovens are designed to reach 999F.   The higher temperature ovens have larger wall thicknesses to accommodate more insulation, explosion proof latches and digital programmable temperature controllers.  The large, floor-positioned holding ovens feature basic digital temperature control, and the bench and portable ovens have analog temperature control or constant input without thermostatic control.

Can I use a Keen portable holding oven for long term storage?

Portable welding electrode ovens are designed primarily for short-term holding, not long-term holding.  Portable units are commonly used by individual welders in the field to keep electrodes dry at the welding station.  Typically, welders are provided electrodes that are stored in a larger, long-term holding oven at the tool crib.  They load up their portable for a day’s work, and any that are left at the end of the day are returned to the crib for rebaking or long term storage.  The portable is shut off until the next time it is used in the field.

Are the large ovens used only for long term storage?

Yes.  Keen holding ovens from 200 lbs capacity and up are designed to be run 24 hours/day, 7 days/week.  The idea is to keep all unpackaged electrodes at elevated temperatures all the time to preserve the integrity of the electrode and to ensure optimal welds.

How can I determine the amp draw for a particular rod oven model?

Use this formula:  Watts / Voltage = Amps

What is the permissible atmospheric exposure of low-hydrogen welding rods?

The AWS specification for carbon steel electrodes (AWS A5.1), E70XX maximum limit is 4 hours. 

For the AWS 5.5 specification, please see below:

E70XX-X      4 hours max
E80XX-X      2 hours max
E90XX-X      1 hour max
E100XX-X    1/2 hour max
E1100XX-X  1/2 hour max

Are there any commonly known welding rod storage methods that are inadequate?

One welding rod storage myth perpetuated by some in the industry is that an old refrigerator equipped with a light bulb will sufficiently heat the covering on low-hydrogen electrodes to the consumable manufacturer recommended storage temperature range of 225-300F.  Most light bulbs do not provide sufficient heat to bring the electrodes up to the proper temperature to stave off moisture contamination in the covering.

Another myth that we have come across over the years is that storing welding electrodes in a freezer will keep the rods dry.   This of course is a myth because as soon as the rods are removed from the freezer they will be a magnet for any atmospheric moisture that exists in the air and produce condensation on the coating.

It is always best to review instructions on the manufacturer’s packaging, and to consult the manufacturer for guidelines of if you have any questions pertaining to proper storage.  Please note that not everyone is informed about welding rod storage, even in customer service departments at major manufacturers.  It is best to speak with an experienced welder or inspector that knows AWS SMAW specifications and proper industry-approved storage guidelines.

What are common storage and handling mistakes that can lead to damaged welding rods?

Welding electrodes are manufactured to be within acceptable moisture limits consistent with the type of covering and strength of the weld metal to be used with the electrode. They are then packaged in a container which has been designed to provide the degree of moisture protection considered necessary by the industry for the type of covering involved.

Some common handling mistakes of welding rods are:

  • Exposing to atmospheric moisture beyond the consumable
    manufacturer’s suggested time limits
  • Storing rods in opened factory packaging
  • Opening the container from the wrong end
  • Tossing the rods around which can crack the low hydrogen coating
    on the welding rods thus rendering them useless
  • Exposing to abrupt temperature fluctuations, particularly from cold to
    warm areas – condensation may be drawn to the coating
  • Exposure to grease or dirt which also contains moisture

What issues can potentially result during welding from improperly stored welding rods?

Poor arc direction, excess spatter, poor shielding, lack of penetration and porosity are common results that occur when welding rod coatings have been contaminated by moisture.  Another common occurrence is “fingernailing” which is a term used to describe uneven burn-off on one side of the welding rod.  This is often due to moisture contamination in one area of the electrode causing it to burn off more slowly than other areas.

What terms should I know that are related to poor storage of welding consumables?

Porosity: formed by entrapment of discrete pockets of gas in the solidifying weld pool.  The gas can be formed in a variety of ways: poor gas shielding, surface contaminants such as  moisture, grease, rust. Porosity can also result from insufficient deoxidants in the parent metal, electrode of filler wire.

Wormholes: A severe form of porosity caused by heavy contamination of the weld pool as a result of surface contamination or welding with damp electrodes.  Under radiograph, they appear as elongated pores and are indicative or a large amount of gas that has formed in the weld which is trapped by the solidifying weld metal.

Hydrogen:  Contributes to cracking in the solidified weld.  In combination with high tensile stresses and sensitive steels, hydrogen can cause cold cracking several hours or days after the weld is complete.  For structural welding using high strength steels, consumables that give low hydrogen levels are often used.  These types of consumables are prone to moisture pick-up and must be stored at elevated temperatures.

How can I tell if the coating on my low-hydrogen welding rods has been compromised?

Visually inspect the rod coating to determine if the color has changed during storage.  Any discolored welding rods should be discarded or your supplier should be contacted.  Also visually inspect for physical damage to the coating that may have occurred during handling.  Any sections of the rod coating that may have been damaged will render the rod useless and it should therefore be discarded.

How can I find recommended storage guidelines from the manufacture of my consumable?

Check the consumable packaging for information, your local supplier and/or the manufacturer of the consumable you purchased. Please note that not everyone is informed about proper welding rod storage, even in customer service departments at major manufacturers.  It is best to speak with an experienced welder or inspector that knows AWS SMAW specifications and proper industry-approved storage guidelines.

How do storage methods differ for low hydrogen rods, stainless steel rods, cellulosic rods and non-low hydrogen rods?

Proper storage procedures should be followed for all types of welding electrodes.  Please consult the consumable manufacturer for specific instructions.   It is generally accepted that the same storing and rebaking procedures for low-hydrogen welding rods also apply to stainless steel welding rods.  Cellulosic electrodes should not be stored in an oven because moisture exposure does not have a detrimental effect on performance.  If non-low-hydrogen rods have been exposed to moisture, they can be heated in a rod oven at low temperatures only (100-120°F).

Can I store different types of welding electrodes simultaneously in a rod oven?

This can present some problems, and the consumable manufacturer must always be contacted before storing multiple types of electrodes together in a single rod oven.  Welding electrodes are manufactured to have a specific range of moisture content.  For example, low-hydrogen rods have a moisture content of approximately 0.1 – 0.4 percent.  Cellulosic rods on the other hand have a moisture content of 4 to 6 percent.  If these two types of electrodes are stored in the same oven, the lower moisture content low-hydrogen rods will absorb moisture from the higher moisture content cellulosic rods.  It is important to note that cellulosic rods are not to be stored long term in a rod oven, and are only heated at low temperatures (100-120°F) if they have been exposed to humid air for an extended period of time.

 


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